Lifestyle · August 19, 2017

A Talk About Work, Ambition and Defining Success

Recently I’ve been having a bit of a think about the term ambition. I briefly touched on it a while ago in one of my Sunday posts; a brief comment on how we view the term alongside success and how, really, I’m not sure they’re directly in correlation with one another. That to
be successful, and most importantly happy- you don’t have to be top of your career ladder. I’m in a fortunate position to be surrounded by both hugely ambitious women, and also women who are not necessarily work driven, but thriving and successful in their chosen careers too- which I think has been totally integral in striking a balance and developing a healthy work/life relationship that suits me.

I’ve read a few pieces online recently talking about success- whether that’s earning more, settling or striving for the next tier, promotion or prestige around the corner. The one that actually inspired this was shared by my friend Jazmine, and was originally shared on Stylist online and hit the nail on the head in so many ways.

Working online, there’s an unspoken pressure about living the to the best of the best- to the absolute top of your game whilst being a total #girlboss in the meantime. It’s great feeling inspired- whether that be to book a holiday or try a new dinner on a Monday night- but it’s okay to not want to try a new recipe and then strive for a restaurant opening the week after. Living a good life isn’t just about earning a high salary, ticking off far flung destinations and buying nice things every week. For some people it might be, but that doesn’t apply for everyone- and I think it’s so important to recognise that- and know whether you strive for those things or not, it shouldn’t dictate your level, or perception, of success.



And of course, it’s making sure that it’s coming from a place that makes you happy. The piece touched on the fact that admitting you’re not overtly ambitious is fine, as long as ‘you are not in truth shying away from challenges because of a lack of confidence’- which I equally think is incredibly important too. In a sense, I do think I’ve always struggled with ambition because I’ve never seen myself as capable. I’ve always felt that there’s an essence of blag in what I do, where people have often said ‘Oh! you’ve landed on your feet!’ Which has always made me question my actual ability- and left me with a constant fear, or, that people expect me to have a solid five year plan in place (I don’t yet, but I’m working on it).

Naturally, I finish this after reading an awe inspiring piece about Emily Weiss- one of the few people who spark an unrivalled sense of ambition in me. Knowing she first approached venture capitalists without a product or business plan but simply an idea is truly something- and definitely shows that a bit of self belief, and setting your own ambition bar as high, or as low, as you feel comfortable- truly makes for the best outcome.

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